I have pimples from wearing a face mask – now what?

I have pimples from wearing a face mask – now what? 1

While wearing a mask is absolutely essential to protect yourself from spreading or contracting Covid-19, the downfall of wearing one is that the skin does not always take too kindly to it. A lot of people are complaining bitterly that they are getting the worst breakouts when they wear PPE-masks. But how are masks contributing to increased breakouts?

There are various factors at play. The most common are:

  • Mechanical irritation of the mask rubbing on the skin causes increased, but not complete, exfoliation.
  • Barrier impairment due to this mechanical irritation is a major driver of pimples under masks. We also see this happening on the hairline when you wear a cap or hat regularly.
  • Moisture and heat from your breath is also trapped inside your mask on your skin. This can have a little bit of a “macerating” effect (like when you lie in the bath too long).
  • Inflammation associated with the mechanical irritation.
  • If you have a tendency to get acne, the inflammatory response is exacerbated by you genetic make-up.
  • The current stress levels that we are experiencing also add to the problem.

 

How is this treated at Lamelle?

  1. The first and most important point is to keep safe and do not stop wearing your mask.
  2. Keep your skin barrier supported by using Lamelle Serra Soothing or Restore Cream, or Lamelle Dermaheal Renewal Cream. Apply a little bit more to the area of skin under you PPE mask to ensure the area is hydrated. You can combine this with the routine you are currently using. A repaired and healthy skin barrier will help prevent further breakouts.
  3. Cleanse your skin twice daily. This must be a critical part of you routine any day and can be done with any Lamelle cleanser. Cleansing ensures dirt, make-up, bacteria and impurities are removed from the skin.
  4. Apply Lamelle’s Clarity Active Control Spot Treatment (R130.00) to the areas where you already have a spot. This will treat the inflammation and help to heal the skin as quickly as possible. Fast healing prevents post-inflammatory pigmentation (dark marks) and also scarring. Start applying it as soon as you see a red spot forming. You should apply this twice daily at a minimum. It could be applied more regularly so carry one in your handbag or pocket so it is always close.
  5. DO NOT PICK! As difficult as it may be, picking at a spot is a total no-go. It most likely will lead to scarring, and can even lead to infection.

 

I have pimples from wearing a face mask – now what? 2

Lamelle Clarity Active Spot Control
This unique spot treatment gel assists in speeding up the healing and recovery process of inflammatory lesions. First and most importantly, Clarity Active Control may reduce pimples by 60–86% in just 8–12 weeks without resulting in bacterial resistance. By using a new blend of the specialised vitamin niacinamide (also known as vitamin B3) and a lab-modified version of ascorbic acid (none of which are antibiotic), Lamelle has created a complex that has no effect on drug resistance in bacteria. What’s more, Clarity Active Control is also formulated to be safe for use on the odd breakout as well as in the treatment of Acne Vulgaris. Bonus! 

If your mask-induced breakout gets worse or spreads to an area that is not covered by your mask please seek professional help.

Information by Karen Bester, Lamelle Medical Trainer.

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